Presenting:  Adam Marsland’s Chaos Band Seventies Sessions
By Bob Davis 

Over the past two years, Adam Marsland’s Chaos Band has run several programs at Brennan’s Pub in Marina del Rey and the Cinema Bar in Culver City, featuring music from the 1970s.  Any genre is fair game, as long as the song was originally recorded between 1-1-1970 and 12-31-1979.  Occasionally a worthy song from the late '60s will be allowed, but usually the time limits are observed.

The most recent example of this series was at Brennan’s on Nov. 3.  I don’t have the full playlist and song order, so this is based on incomplete data, but it will give some idea of how much fun these shows are.  I don’t know if Adam will continue what we might even call a “tradition”, but there are plenty more good songs that haven’t been covered yet.  From time to time, I threaten to do "Long Tall Glasses (I Can Dance)," the Leo Sayer song from 1975, which has a killer guitar part and also includes a piano in the backing.

Adam usually does some Elton John songs, and the band will sometimes add “Love Train” to the mix (one of my faves, for obvious reasons).

Carolyn Edwards chose Elton John’s “Someone Saved My Life”, with Adam playing some Eltonian piano. He’s also done “Elton John Tribute Nights”, where every song is from the Reginald Dwight catalog.


Who’s playing the Fender Bass?   It’s Ms. Sparklebass, Teresa Cowles….


It’s been over 20 years since Tracey Ulman had a TV show, but
one of her songs is remembered as Lisa Mychols sings “They Don’t Know”


Bruce Ray White sang a relatively obscure Bob Dylan number,
“Oh Sister” and blew some harp, too.


Rachel Wolfe was called up for tambourine duty (we’ll see more of
her later in the show) while Teresa lays down that bass line.

 
Kurt Medlin has been playing drums with Adam for many years now.  
I especially like it when the band does Fleetwood Mac’s “Go Your
Own Way"-- he just “nails” the drum part!


Dave Kaufman did “Spiders and Snakes,” originally by Jim Stafford
in 1974, and “Panic in Detroit,” a number I’d never heard of.


Aimee Lay took us for a ride on the “Midnight Train to Georgia”.


I call Evie Sands “Our Guitar Goddess” but she plays keyboards too.



One of the highlights of the show was a newcomer to the Seventies Sessions, Ms. Aeb Byrne.  She sang my favorite Janis Joplin song, “Me and Bobby McGee,” while the Chaos Band covered the Full Tilt Boogie Band in fine style.  The whole performance just blew me away.  (in one of my early Old Curiosity Shop columns, I mention meeting a member of Big Brother and the Holding Company in San Francisco back in the '60s.  He told me about their new singer, Janis Joplin, and I 
didn’t ask where they were playing.  “Regrets, I’ve had a few…..”


Maureen Mahan has joined with AMCB for a number of shows;
she chose some “up front” songs: “Brass in Pocket” (a big hit for
Chryssie Hind and the Pretenders) and “Rip Her to Shreds”.


The Seventies were known to some as the “Disco Era,” so Camille
Santochi went back to 1978 for Alicia Bridges’ “I Love the Nightlife”.

One of the regulars with the AMCB shows is Rachel Wolfe.  There’s even a video of her singing the Gary Wright number “Love Is Alive” on YouTube.  For this show she chose what’s usually considered to be a “guy song”, Foreigner’s “Feels Like the First Time”.  No worries, Rachel took the song and ran with it.  Here she is, with Evie on the guitar-- two of my favorite ladies of song.

Among the songs that I don’t have photos for:

Rob Z., who does the Mike Love parts when it’s Beach Boys night, “Rainbow Connection” for all the Muppet fans in the audience.

Dave Serby, one of my favorite Seventies songs, “Stuck in the Middle”, with the guitar bridge that Evie just goes to town on.  I usually give her a big “thumbs up” and she gives me a smile.

Mike Schnee (also known as Chisum Worthington-- for this identity he dresses like a certain late-night TV car salesman).  He did a gender-bending number titled, “My Girl Bill.

As you can see, there’s a lot of variety and a lot of enjoyment at a Chaos Band event.

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